Notes


Matches 1 to 36 of 36

     

 #   Notes   Linked to 
1 * Although we cannot be certain that Peggy is John's daughter, we believe with a high degree of certainty that she is.


 
McDonald, John (I500038)
 
2

Property was a carpenter by trade. This corresponds with his families occupation as loggers.


 
McDonald, Property Rhyme (I19)
 
3

John In Scotland:


John McDonald was more than likely born in Scotland somewhere 1695-1705. There is currently nothing known of his parents and where they lived in Scotland. However, there are a couple of probable facts that can be inferred. John was probably the eldest son and the namesake of his father. Also, it is probably the case that his father was a tailor as that was a specific trade skill John had. In addition, we know that John passed that down to his children as well.


John McDonald's Emigration to the Colonies:


John McDonald emigrated to the colonies 1725-1729,   as a British soldier.  This, of course, allows us to speculate regarding John's circumstances prior to emigrating. The first note, that stands out is that John was not poor or a servant like many of his Scottish brethren. There are two facts that support this: first, there was significant Scotch emigration 1705-1719, most of which were poor and persecuted. Most of these settlers were impoverished when they arrived in the colonies and as a result, made servants. However, it is our belief that John emigrated after this early emigration. What's more, when he arrived he was as a British soldier. The fact that he was a British soldier may indeed indicate that he either resided in England before he departed for the Colonies, or he was an Ulster-Scot from Northern Ireland. We speculate the latter.


Marriage and Family: 


John married Freelove Bucklin on 15 March, 1731/32. Freelove was from a prominent Quaker family. John was a Presbyterian. John was made an official citizen on 6 May, 1734/35. John and Freelove lived in Providence Rhode Island. 


It is unclear precisely how many children John and Freelove had. We know for certain they had three. However, there is sufficient evidence to suggest they had six total: Barack, Mary, Sarah, John, Peggy, and Laban. 


The French and Indian Wars:


The French and Indian Wars were comprised of four installments and ultimately led to the Revolutionary War. John McDonald fought in the third installment. However, he did not fight as a British soldier, but as a militia member. This installment was also referred to as King George's War.


Tradition asserts that John McDonald's militia was the first to register and be deployed. It is unclear as to why John was so eager to sign up. However, there is a local tradition that tells of an incident were some Ulster-Scots were brutally attacked, which sparked a militia insurgency. If this tradition is correct then we might be given even more insight into where John came from.


John's militia traveled to the newly formed French/Canadian town of Cape Breton Island in Nova Scotia. The French were in the process of building a fort there. John's militia annihilated the French there and seized the fort at Louisbourg on November of 1744/45. However, as irony seldom cares for whom it imprisons, there was a major food blight, which resulted in diseased food. This coupled with the harsh Canadian winter resulted in the death of the militia who was unable to get supplies from the colonies.


Death:


John's death is listed as 14 Nov, 1744. He left no formal will. However, there was a filed document of his property.   Freelove died on 3, Sept 1772.


 
McDonald, John (I500038)
 
4 According to census data Eva lists here parents as being from Indonesia. One possible reason for this could be that she was adopted.

 
McDonald, Eva (I428)
 
5 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family F123
 
6 AFTER JEREMIAH'S DEATH:

Not surprisingly Eunice married right away after finding out about Jeremiah's death. She married her neighbor A.J. Ipe. Soon thereafter, Eunice gave birth. Emma can be seen going by "Emily" as well.

It is also important to note that there is a transcription error as it relates to the McDonald brothers. In the 1880 census transcripts, the McDonald brothers are listed as "Ipe". However, looking at the actual census will show that "McDonald" is written in there. Why it was transcribed as "Ipe" is not clear. This error has resulted in the McDonald brothers being listed in the "Ipe" genealogy as being part of the bloodline.

In 1897 Eunice died of stomach cancer. According to her obituary, we see it listed as "stomach problems".


 
Family F86
 
7 After the death of Jeremiah, Eunice (Clark's mother) married into the Ipe family. Clark and his brothers (also going by the "McDonald brothers") took control over their father's land. Approximately 40 acres.

 
Family F92
 
8 All that is known about Ray is that there were other children that resided with him from Blanche's previous marriage. The children's names were: Algadia, Clifton, Eva, Carlton, and Tato Rector. Nothing else is known at this time. McDonald, Ray (I427)
 
9 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family F123
 
10 Barack learned the art of tailoring from his father John. Barack was also a landowner. Barack was made a freeman (able to own land and vote) on 8 May 1756, which convene in Newport Rhode Island. Barack married Alice Sprague on 18 December 1757.

Barack was a witness to land deals between Daniel Eddy and Joshua Winsor. This provides an important connection between the McDonald and Eddy family, which provides additional evidence that Peggy (Margaret) was the daughter of John McDonald and sister to Barack.
 
McDonald, Barack (Baruch Barrich) (I500023)
 
11 Barack was made a freeman in 1756.  McDonald, Barack (Baruch Barrich) (I500023)
 
12 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family F14
 
13 Caleb died of yellow fever in 1823. McDonald, Alice (I500031)
 
14 Death: Complications from Pneumonia lead Rebecca to have a stroke. McDonald, Rebecca (I500009)
 
15 Died of emphysema and heart disease. Guy also had diabetes.  McDonald, Guy Marcus (I274)
 
16 Died of heart disease. McDonald, Seeley (I22)
 
17 Died of Typhoid Fever. Haight, Mary (I12)
 
18 Elihu died of Malaria. McDonald, Elihu Andrew (I405)
 
19 EUGENE AND HIS BROTHER:

After the death of Jeremiah, Eunice (Eugene's mother) married into the Ipe family. Eugene and his brothers (also going by the "McDonald brothers") took control over their father's land. Approximately 40 acres. Eugene inherited his father's land at age 25.

In 1897, Eugene's mother, Eunice dies of stomach cancer.

From the late 1800's until 1912 Eugene and his brothers barter land and move back and forth from one acreage to another. It is not entirely clear the purpose of this.

THE LAND TODAY:

After visiting the property a few years ago, one can quickly see that much of the land at one time was covered in dense trees. It is quite possible with the skills in lumbering that their father had that they too were lumbered the area.

EUGENE'S WIVES AND CHILDREN:

It is also not clear what happened to Eugene's first wife. We know very little about her. We only know that she quickly disappears from history's record. It's possible that they had one child together (possibly 2): Cora Etta and possibly Charles.

In 1912 Eugene married Myrtle Rosenberger. They have two children together, Charles, Eva and Roy.

LATER IN LIFE:

In 1924 Eugene died. Eugene is buried in Solon cemetery near Cedar Springs Michigan. His grave is very unimpressive. It looks like that family, which he still had around did not have the funds necessary to provide an appropriate place of burial. His stone is a very small piece with faded engagements and buried deeply in the ground. 
McDonald, Major (Eugene) (I3)
 
20 Harley was born and educated in Providence RI where he lived until 1848. While in providence he learned the trade of architecture and building. In August of 1849, Harley set out on the ship Hopewell Littlefield so that he might partake in the Goldrush of California as well as begin contracting. Harley landed in San Francisco in February of 1849.

Narrowly escapes death

According to several accounts regarding Harley’s life, he narrowly escaped death at the hands of Indians on two occasions. On one such occasion, he was attacked by some Digger Indians. He was stripped and bound by his neck. The Indians then proceeded to create targets on various parts of his body, with the chief marking one on his forehead. Then they tortured him by pretending to fire their arrows at him. As Harley was slowly losing consciousness one of the Indians began looking in Harley’s pockets and discovered a New Testament that had been given to him by his sister before leaving for California. Inside was an image of the crucified Christ. So moved were the Indians that they untied Harley, clothed him and released him.

After this encounter with the Native Indians Harley decided to leave San Francisco. Shortly after beginning his trek he encountered a ferocious Grizzly Bear who reared back on its hind legs. Having no weapon with him, Harley slowly slipped behind a tree and then escaped. Upon arriving back with his group, he learned of a plot to attack some native Indians who had killed some miners a few days earlier. They performed a surprise attack at night. During the skirmish one Indian died, a young boy escaped and four were detained. The four who were detained were taken to Marysville to stand trial and were ultimately convicted and hung for their crimes.

San Francisco

Harley was quite successful during his mining for gold and always kept with him a ring that was made out of the gold he first struck in 1850. He had also had time to work his trade. Harley is credited for designing a type of door, which he had built for General Sherman. The door was made of a giant rosewood log which Harley had towed across the bay himself. He also built the first Wharf and Theater. Harley lived in San Francisco for a year.

Portland and Moves

After his stay in California Harley moved to Portland Oregon in July of 1850. For the next 8 years Harley built a reputation as being a competent contractor. During this time Harley built the first Congregational Church and the first steamboat called the Hoosier.

In 1858 Harley relocated about 25 miles west to Forest Grove, which was a newly established community. Harley built the first Congregational Church and several other buildings.

In 1860 Harley moved to Salem where he lived for 10 years. He built the first train station while there.
After Salem Harley moved a few more times – once to Portland and then to Forest Grove again. During this time Harley built many structures including the home he resided in for 25 years. Ironically, he was also responsible for building school houses for Indian children.

Although Harley never gave up contracting work the last 25 years of his life were spent in politics and government having built for himself an honorable reputation.

 
McDonald, Harley (I472)
 
21 Henry was a wood turner. McDonald, Henry (I23)
 
22 In 1861 William was involved in a circular saw accident that caused him to have his arm amputated.  Arnold, William D. (I334)
 
23 In his 40's Barack served as a Quarter Master during the Revolutionary War.  McDonald, Barack (Baruch Barrich) (I500023)
 
24 It is not entirely clear why Jeremiah and his family moved to such a remote location from the city of Johnston, but they acquired a considerable amount of land - approx., 2,000 acres. Jeremiah built the house that sat on the land until 1988. This land served three generations of McDonald's.

Jeremiah and Mary's first son born to them in Glastonbury Vermont was the first child born in that city - Jeremiah McDonald (second generation). Glastonbury was barely inhabitable due to its dense forests and very large hills. In fact, 1780-1800 saw no more than 50 residents. By 1800 there were nearly 100, many of whom were new to the area. The McDonald family lumbered the property until approx., 1864.

Jeremiah McDonald is buried in Maple Hill Cemetary, Shaftsbury Vermont.

Mary Burgess married as her second husband Elias Gatee. Mary Burgess is buried in Gorham or Potter New York at Nettle Valley Cemetary.
 
McDonald, Jeremiah (I7)
 
25 Jeremiah and his wife Mary burgess moved from Johnston Rhode Island to Bennington Vermont sometime between 1792-1799. Jeremiah sold his portion of his Father’s estate to his brother (John) in 1792. Jeremiah reappears in Shaftsbury Vermont 1800 census.
 
McDonald, Jeremiah (I7)
 
26 JEREMIAH IN THE CIVIL WAR:

In September of 1862, Jeremiah and a few of his friends signed up to fight in the Civil War. Again, it is unclear why they did this since Jeremiah had 2 young children, 1 infant, and possibly a wife who was pregnant with another baby. On the night of July 14th, 1863 in Falling Waters Maryland Jeremiah's unit received a surprise attack from behind their unit by General Lee. In that attack, Jeremiah McDonald was killed.

 
Family F86
 
27 JEREMIAH'S TRAVELS:

We are not clear when Jeremiah moved from Vermont to New York. We know that he was still in Vermont according to the 1850 Census. According to the Maibe family genealogy, we know that Eunice, Jeremiah, and her family moved to Michigan in 1854.

In 1855 their first son Major Eugene McDonald was born. According to census records, he was born in 1855 in New York. All of this evidences suggesters that Jeremiah moved to New York (for reasons we do not know) 1851-1853; then moved from New York to Michigan in 1854. It would be very beneficial to know why Jeremiah left his large family to move to New York - Italy, New York to be exact. It is also not entirely clear why Solon Michigan was their destination.

Due to Solon cemetery and census records, we know that Eunice's parents went with them on their trip to Michigan. They had their own property and died there in the small town of Solon. There is also strong evidence to suggest that at least a couple of Eunice's brothers went as well since they show up on the Solon Census and land map. Based on our timelines, it must have been the case that the second born "Clark" was born while they traveled.

JEREMIAH IN THE CIVIL WAR:

In September of 1862, Jeremiah and a few of his friends signed up to fight in the Civil War. Again, it is unclear why they did this since Jeremiah had 2 young children, 1 infant, and possibly a wife who was pregnant with another baby. On the night of July 14th, 1863 in Falling Waters Maryland Jeremiah's unit received a surprise attack from behind their unit by General Lee. In that attack, Jeremiah McDonald was killed.

AFTER JEREMIAH'S DEATH:

Not surprisingly Eunice married right away after finding out about Jeremiah's death. She married her neighbor A.J. Ipe. Soon thereafter, Eunice gave birth. Emma can be seen going by "Emily" as well.

It is also important to note that there is a transcription error as it relates to the McDonald brothers. In the 1880 census transcripts, the McDonald brothers are listed as "Ipe". However, looking at the actual census will show that "McDonald" is written in there. Why it was transcribed as "Ipe" is not clear. This error has resulted in the McDonald brothers being listed in the "Ipe" genealogy as being part of the bloodline.

In 1897 Eunice died of stomach cancer. According to her obituary, we see it listed as "stomach problems". 
McDonald, Jeremiah (I5)
 
28 JEREMIAH'S TRAVELS:

We are not clear when Jeremiah moved from Vermont to New York. We know that he was still in Vermont according to the 1850 Census. According to the Maibe family genealogy, we know that Eunice, Jeremiah, and her family moved to Michigan in 1854. We begin with the census data.

In 1855 their first son Major Eugene McDonald was born. According to census records, he was born in 1855 in New York. All of this evidences suggesters that Jeremiah moved to New York (for reasons we do not know) 1851-1853; then moved from New York to Michigan in 1854. It would be very beneficial to know why Jeremiah left his large family to move to New York - Italy, New York to be exact. It is also not entirely clear why Solon Michigan was their destination.

Due to Solon cemetery and census records, we know that Eunice's parents went with them on their trip to Michigan. They had their own property and died there in the small town of Solon. There is also strong evidence to suggest that at least a couple of Eunice's brothers went as well since they show up on the Solon Census and land map. Based on our timelines, it must have been the case that the second born "Clark" was born while they traveled.

 
Family F86
 
29 Margaret died of Bright's Disease, now referred to as acute/chronic Nephritis. McDonald, Margaret (I219)
 
30 Mary McDonald was married to John Hughes. They had a son named John L. Hughes. One day John went out on his horse and was never seen again. Mary and others went out looking for him. No one found him. After a few years, Mary married James Henry Reader. They had 3 children. When Mary was older she lived with her daughter Fannie Wagner and her family in American Falls Id. They had a lean-to where she stayed. Flossie Bell Ellis Wagner remembers how she loved her grandmother-in-law and told her daughter Verna Mae Wagner Morgan about this story.  McDonald, Mary Morgana (I223)
 
31 Obit:
Seth McDonald, aged 87 years, the 31st of last December, passed away Tuesday morning, February 18th, at 9:30 o'clock, after being confined to his bed with heart trouble for about two and one-half years.

He was born in Bennington, Vermont, and came to West Italy with his parents when a boy. He had lived in Gorham about 48 years. Mr. McDonald married Miss Caroline Galusha 61 years ago. Those surviving, besides his wife, are one daughter, Mrs. Estella Whyte; one grandson. Seth Whyte, and a number of nephews.

The funeral will be held, today (Friday) at 1 o'clock, from the home, and 2 o'clock from the Baptist church. Rev. F. W. Ford pastor of the church, officiating. Burial at Gorham cemetery.

Lynn McConnell, of Prattsburg, a nephew of the deceased, had charge of the funeral. 
McDonald, Seth (I136)
 
32 Spouse: Freelove McDonald (born Bucklin) Family F500007
 
33 The history surrounding Peggy indicates that she was a tailoress, which coincides nicely with the fact that her father, John McDonald was a tailor by trade. Peggy McDonald lived the latter part of her life in Thompson, Windham, Connecticut, where she also died.

Most of what we know about Peggy McDonald comes from the Eddy Family genealogy.
 
McDonald, Margaret (I8)
 
34 There is very little documentation surrounding the life of John McDonald. Tradition asserts only one incident surrounding his possible death. It is believed that he died in 1758 in the campaign at Lake Champlain. John would have been 25/26 when he died. This early death may also be the reason why there is no record of family.

ALL OF THE INFORMATION WE CURRENTLY HAVE IS BASED ON TRADITION AND SPECULATION. 
McDonald, John (I457)
 
35 William was a state senator for Vermont in 1878. Arnold, William D. (I334)
 
36 Worked in a chair shop with his brother. McDonald, Charles Amos (I24)